Springsteen Cancels N.C. Show: 5 Reasons He Really Is “The Boss”

Bruce Springsteen
Photo credit: Facebook/brucespringsteen
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Normally, the headline “Bruce Springsteen Cancels Concert” wouldn’t be well received, but this time, he couldn’t have made a better decision. That’s because the cancellation of the Greensboro, North Carolina show is in protest of the state’s recent legislation that both decides which bathroom transgender persons can use and harms the ability for LGBT people to sue for human rights violations in the workplace. Springsteen called the cancellation “the strongest means I have for raising my voice in opposition to those who continue to push us backwards instead of forwards.”

Bruce Springsteen’s North Carolina show cancellation in protest of the anti-LGBT law is just the latest in a long list of events in which the man known as “The Boss” lived up to the nickname. Here are some other examples.

The Greenbacks, a Donor with No Name

Bruce Springsteen regularly makes large donations to charities, particularly those in his home state of New Jersey. But what really makes him a class act is that he doesn’t make most of his charity work public. In fact, there are still donations he has made that nobody has been able to attribute to him!

Easy Money

In case it wasn’t clear from the above example, fame isn’t all about the money to Bruce Springsteen. He and his band, the E Street Band, take an equal cut of all profits. Plus, in the 1980s, when Springsteen and the band were preparing to go their separate ways, despite the latter feeling there was still so much for them do accomplish together, The Boss softened the blow by offering them $2.0 million severance pay each.

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We Still Take That Ride

The song “American Skin (41 Shots)” is about the death of 22-year-old Amadou Diallo, who was killed by New York City police (“41” refers to the number of times he was fired at). While the song was well-received, the sentiment wasn’t shared by some New York authorities, including then-mayor Rudolph Giuliani, who suggested New York officers should boycott Springsteen concerts. Despite police protest, The Boss played the song during a Madison Square Garden gig. Current performances of the song are now dedicated to Treyvon Martin, another young black man who was unfairly killed by police.

The Cosmic Kid

While Bruce Springsteen likely isn’t as popular with the younger set as he is with their parents, he still has fans who are both young and young at heart. One of the former, nine-year-old Xabi Glovsky, attended a Springsteen concert in spite of the consequences: it was on a school night! The child brought a sign that read, “Bruce, I will be late to school tomorrow please sign my note,” probably at least in part as a joke, but imagine his surprise when Springsteen actually brought the boy and his dad backstage and wrote him a note to “excuse him if he is tardy” because he “has been out very late rocking & rolling.”

For You

That’s just one example of Bruce Springsteen being down to earth, but there have been countless stories of The Boss being a man of the people over the years. Some notable examples include bringing a fan who had just been dumped on stage and helping him get over it, playing with random buskers (street performers) that he just happens to walk by, watching a movie with a fan and then going home to meet his parents, and inviting himself to local parties.

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