One Important Thing You Need to Consider Before Settling Down With an Older Man
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Whether you’re dating an older man or someone who’s the same age, it’s important to know what you want out of the relationship—and what you don’t want, for that matter. That’s why more and more people are now adding “lifestyle clauses” to their prenuptial agreements, to make sure their partners know what’s expected of them.

The agreements have aptly been labeled “love contracts,” and according to experts, many of the clauses that come up have to do with weight gain, cheating, and even sex. Several celebrity couples have already hopped on this trend. Michael Douglas and his younger wife, Catherine Zeta-Jones, have an agreement that if he cheats, she’ll get $5.0 million. If Justin Timberlake cheats on Jessica Biel, he’ll be paying her $500,000. Nicole Kidman placed an entirely different type of clause in her prenup agreement with her recovered cocaine-addict husband, Keith Urban—if he uses any type of illegal drug, he loses all of his entitlement over her fortune.

“Love contracts” aren’t only for married couples—lifestyle clauses can also be put into cohabitation agreements for couples that just live together, but have no intention of tying the knot. Like a prenup, cohabitation agreements set the terms for what’s expected in the relationship, and what would happen to assets if the common-law couple splits up.

Putting your specific expectations down on paper can be especially valuable for younger women who are with older men, regardless of whether or not it leads to marriage. Because of the age gap, there are likely going to be a whole new set of issues that need to be addressed in your relationship, such as ex-wives and children. Younger men and older women in age-gap relationships are also more likely to have different values and priorities in life, and if these are not addressed at the beginning of your relationship, they can lead to detrimental, not to mention heartbreaking, consequences down the road.

Source:

Marsh, L., “‘Love contracts’ that make requirements on sex, weight, cheating are increasingly common, experts say,” New York Daily News web site, June 3, 2013; http://goo.gl/pC91E.

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