Kylie Jenner Plus 6 Other Stars Who Want Ridiculous Trademarks

Kylie Jenner
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When you’re an international celebrity, like Kylie Jenner, you understandably have to go the extra mile to protect your assets, but where do you draw the line, and how far is too far? Kylie Jenner has been trying to trademark the one thing she’s really known for—her first name—and even filed the trademark application in August 2015. If approved, it would prevent anyone else from using “Kylie” for the purpose of advertising. As you can imagine, the motion isn’t sitting well with another famous face who shares the moniker: singer Kylie Minogue.

Earlier this week, Minogue filed her own notice of opposition in response to Kylie Jenner’s application, due to the fact that the trademark would infringe on the brand she’s worked so many years to build. In response, Jenner filed yet another trademark application the day after Minogue submitted the opposition. Even we have to admit that trying to trademark a name, a common one at that, is a little absurd, but then everything Kylie Jenner does is a little out there. We’ll have to wait and see how this legal “Kylie” battle pans out, but in the meantime, here are six other celebrities who have trademarked some pretty outrageous things.

1. Taylor Swift: The singer applied to trademark a bunch of phrases in December 2015, including “Swiftmas,” “Blank Space,” “And I’ll Write Your Name,” and “1989.” It wasn’t the first time the singer trademarked phrases related to her albums and songs. Earlier in the year she tried to trademark “this sick beat,” “nice to meet you; where you been,” and “party like it’s 1989.”

Taylor Swift

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2. Jay Z: The music mogul and his wife, Beyoncé, tried to trademark “Blue Ivy,” their daughter’s name, but ultimately lost, partly because another company had been using the name since 2009, three years before baby Blue Ivy was born. Although initial reports claimed the celebrity couple wanted to trademark the name so that they could use it to launch their own line of baby products, Jay Z later clarified the real reason, saying, “People wanted to make products based on our child’s name and you don’t want anybody trying to benefit off your baby’s name.”

3. Paris Hilton: Back in 2007, the reality star managed to successfully trademark “That’s Hot,” which was her catchphrase on The Simple Life at the time. A couple years later, Hallmark tried to use the phrase in one of their cards without any mention of Paris Hilton; needless to say, she took action. Fortunately they were able to settle the case out of court.

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4. Rachel Zoe: While starring in her reality show The Rachel Zoe Project, the stylist popularized the catchphrases “I die” and “bananas.” She applied to trademark both phrases. One T-shirt designer even launched a campaign to “free the fruit” in 2009, which seems to have worked, because “bananas” doesn’t appear to be trademarked. However, Rachel Zoe still appears to own the trademark for “I die.”

Rachel Zoe

 

5. Anthony Davis: In addition to his skills on the court, this NBA player is also known for his prominent unibrow. So, in 2012, he trademarked the phrases “fear the brow” and “raise the brow.” He later revealed his reasoning for doing it in an interview with CNBC: “I don’t want anyone to try to grow a unibrow because of me and then try to make money off of it.” He’s got a point—if anyone is going to make money of the unibrow, it should be Anthony Davis!

6. Ryan Lochte: In 2012, the Olympic gold-medal swimmer moved to trademark his weird catchphrase, “Jeah,”not to be confused with rapper Lil Wayne’s line “Chea” (although that is what served as Lochte’s inspiration). According to the filed paperwork, Lochte wanted to reserve the word so that he could use it to brand a range of products, from sunglasses, jewelry, and clothing to fitness DVDs and water bottles. The athlete tried to explain what the word means, but he probably ended up confusing people more: “It means, like, almost, like, everything,” Lochte said in a 2009 YouTube video. “Like happy. Like, if you have a good swim, you say, ‘Jeah.’ Like, it’s good. So, I guess… it means good.”

Photo: Instagram/kyliejenner
Photo: Instagram/taylorswift
Photo: Instagram/rachelzoe

 
 
 
 

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